Monthly Archives: June 2015

Opening Up Possibilities with the FeltLOOM

We recently ran across this post by Jennifer at All Sorts Acre, and thought it was the perfect way to show how one FeltLOOMer works with her FeltLOOM. She has a Lexi, our tabletop model (below).

This week I thought I would try something different. I have a Lexi FeltLOOM needle felting machine. It is a great little machine that really opens up felting possibilities exponentially.

The Lexi FeltLOOM needle felting machine.

The Lexi FeltLOOM needle felting machine.

The Lexi means that I can make my own fabric. It makes the felting process faster, more versatile, and in some ways easier. Using it still has a learning curve, because, like felting, each type of fibre behaves very differently on it. Combine that with using a base fabric, and the possibilities are endless.

I don’t often use a base fabric in my felt projects, I usually just use wool, but having a woven fabric in between the front and back layer can give an incredible stability to the felt that can be time consuming to achieve when just using wool. Having the woven fabric in the centre also means that when sewing pieces together, no fabric stabilizer is needed. I have found that some types of wool are better for sewing into directly than others, but that is for another blog post.

Needle felted table runner.

Needle felted table runner.

Anyway, I had some loose cotton weave fabric lying around. I don’t remember too much about it, except that I wanted to experiment with it. So I did. Using some of my ready-to-use wool stash (all local and many different types) I got several balls of wool ready and layer it out onto the fabric.

I then put it through the FeltLOOM. To begin with I had fabric on one side only. I was not happy with this result as the woven fibres pulled and didn’t look lice on the back. So I ended up adding a layer to the back of the fabric as feel. this helped immensely. Not only did it hide the pulled threads, but it also gave the wool fibres on the front of the piece something to lock into on the back.

The front and back of the table runner.

The front and back of the table runner.

You can see threads from the cotton fabric at the edge of the piece. This is due to my rushing. Normally I would have had the fabric smaller than the piece O wanted to work on so when I trimmed it there would be a nice thread-free finished edge.
But this was an experiment so I just wanted to see what would happen.

I may put some edging on it, or further develop this into a purse or bag, I haven’t decided. yet. Regardless, I am gonigg to give it a quick wet felting to make sure all the fibres are truly locked together.  orFor now it makes a great table runner.

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